PEPA-20

31st Annual Crime Prevention Guide P r i n c e E d w a r d I s l a n d P o l i c e A s s o c i a t i o n Child Abuse Awareness

1 CHILD ABUSE AWARENESS

31ST ANNUAL CRIME PREVENTION GUIDE 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS 31st Annual Crime Prevention Guide Message from the Premier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Message from the PEIPA President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Executive Members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Message from the Publisher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Message from the Mayor of Charlottetown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Message from the Mayor of Summerside . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Message from the Charlottetown Deputy Chief of Police . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Message from the Summerside Chief of Police . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Blast from the Past . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Child Abuse Awareness What is child abuse? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Physical abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Child discipline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Sexual abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Emotional abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Neglect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 When a parent abducts their child . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Violence based on so-called honour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Signs of abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Effects of child abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Family Violence Quiz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Kids Help Phone 101 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Wants versus needs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Common feelings with abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 How to identify a safe adult . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Report Child Abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Need help but don’t know where to start? Call 211 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 ADVERTISERS’ INDEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 www.peipolice.com WE SUPPORT KIDS HELP PHONE! Proceeds from our 31st Annual Crime Prevention Guide project have allowed the PEIPA to make a $1,000 donation to KIDS HELP PHONE which provides 24/7 support and counselling to help children with any issue – big or small. Last year, children on PEI reached out to the KIDS HELP PHONE over 6,000 times.

3 CHILD ABUSE AWARENESS MESSAGE FROM THE PEIPA PRESIDENT EXECUTIVE MEMBERS As President of the Prince Edward Island Police Association, I would like to thank the citizens and business members in our Island communities for supporting our 31st Annual Crime Prevention Guide which focuses on the very serious problem of Child Abuse to help educate and promote the public’s role in identifying and reporting this terrible crime. This publication is made possible by the contributions and support of many individuals, businesses and organizations throughout the province, and we are very grateful for their contributions that allow us to reach Prince Edward Island’s citizens and educate our communities about crime prevention issues. We very much appreciate your financial contributions and your interest in our community publication. Proceeds from our 31st Annual Crime Prevention Guide project have allowed the PEI Police Association to make a $1,000 donation to KIDS HELP PHONE which provides 24/7 support and counselling to help PEI children with any issue – big or small. Thank you for continuing to work together with us to build safe communities across our beautiful province of Prince Edward Island. Sincerely, Sgt. Ron MacLean President PEI Police Association Ron Kennedy Vice-President East Jason Blacquiere Vice-PresidentWest Allan Kelly Recording Secretary Tim Keizer Treasurer Dale Corish DirectorWest www.peipolice.com

31ST ANNUAL CRIME PREVENTION GUIDE 4 Colin Younker Owner 670 University Avenue Charlottetown, PE C1E 1H6 (902) 566-1400 Fax: (902) 566-3868 colin@spatotalfitness.com www.spatotalfitness.com HEAD OFFICE 23784 Trans Canada Hwy Borden-Carlton PE C0B 1X0 902.437.3737 Fax: 902.437.3749 FOLDING CARTON DIVISION Borden, PEI 902.437.3737 CORRUGATE DIVISION Dieppe, New Brunswick 506.389.3737 Delivering mental health programs and services to people living in Prince Edward Island. We’re here to help you and the communities you serve. Find more information and contacts at www.pei.cmha.ca 902854-3265 “No More Leaks Over Your Head” Proudly Serving Prince & Queens County for over 20 Years. 5 Year Replacement Guarantee Residential & Commercial Installations • 5” Seamless Aluminum Eavestrough • Leaf guards • No More Rust and Leaks • Variety of Colors to Choose From • No Spikes Showing (installed with brackets inside eavestrough) • Soffit & Fascia Installation Call Kevin Arsenault today Cell: 439-1548 Wellington, PEI

5 CHILD ABUSE AWARENESS MESSAGE FROM THE PUBLISHER On behalf of the Prince Edward Island Police Association, I would like to take this opportunity to sincerely thank each and every contributor to our Annual Telephone Appeal, allowing this unique publication to be distributed to schools, libraries and public facilities and also available online at peipolice.com, making it easily accessible to everyone. The PEI Police Association publishes an Annual Crime Prevention Guide to educate the public on important community concerns. This 31st Annual Crime Prevention Guide targets Child Abuse Awareness to help educate and promote the public’s role in identifying and reporting this terrible crime. This publication is made possible as a result of financial contributions from residents and business representatives throughout the province. With their generous support for the activities of the PEI Police Association, the PEIPA is also able to give back to their communities through donations to various local charities and programs for youth, such as their recent generous donation to KIDS HELP PHONE to help young people who are struggling to cope. We welcome comments or suggestions regarding these publications and always look forward to speaking with you each year during our Annual Telephone Appeal. Respectfully, Mark T. Fenety President Fenety Marketing Services “Providing quality, professional marketing and fundraising services on behalf of high-profile, non-profit organizations across Canada.” www.fenety.com 1-800-561-4422

31ST ANNUAL CRIME PREVENTION GUIDE 6 SUMMERSIDE 888-2088 (902) 505 Granville #1c CHARLOTTETOWN 566-9000 (902) 386 UniverisityAvenue 201 Buchannan Drive STRATFORD 566-9000 (902) 14 Kinlock Drive MacKinnon Bros. Service Centre 419 Mount Edward Road Charlottetown, PE Licensed Mechanics Inspection Alignment Brake Service (902) 892-7781 (902) 892-2771 Proud Supporter of the PEI Police Association

7 CHILD ABUSE AWARENESS On behalf of the City of Charlottetown, I wish to congratulate the Prince Edward Island Police Association on their 31st Annual Crime Prevention Guide. This year’s theme is “Child Abuse Awareness”, a topic that impacts the most vulnerable in our communities. This year’s guide seeks to raise awareness about child abuse. The pandemic has impacted us all, but its effects have been felt more strongly by the most vulnerable members of our society, including children. With increased pressure on the mental health of all Islanders, knowledge is a powerful tool when addressing concerns about the safety and welfare of children. The information made available in this guide will help build upon our knowledge base and provide additional awareness. To quote Nelson Mandela, “We owe our children - the most vulnerable citizens in any society - a life free from violence and fear”. Awareness is a key component in helping others. The information made available through the publication of this guide, contributes to a broader sense of community safety, health, and well-being. In closing, it is my sincere hope that the information provided in this guide will be used to broaden the discussions, encourage reporting of child abuse and supporting our young people. I wish to thank the members of the PEI Police Association for their efforts in producing this guide and wish them well in their future endeavours. Yours Sincerely, Phillip Brown Mayor City of Charlottetown MESSAGE FROM THE MAYOR OF CHARLOTTETOWN

31ST ANNUAL CRIME PREVENTION GUIDE 8 ROBIN LANGSTON MANAGER 902-892-9977 - office • 902-892-6690 - fax 902-213-2580 - cell robinl@npssconsulting.ca www.npssconsulting.ca SECURITY • VEHICLE PATROL • BYLAW ENFORCEMENT

9 CHILD ABUSE AWARENESS On behalf of the City of Summerside I would like to congratulate the PEI Police Association on the publication of their 31st Annual Crime Prevention Guide. Thirty-one years of publishing this informative and timely guide is a wonderful accomplishment. This year’s focus on “Child Abuse Awareness” serves to educate and promote the public’s role in identifying and reporting this terrible crime. The City of Summerside is proud to be a part of this publication and its efforts to inform our population and keep our community safe and healthy. Furthermore, proceeds raised from this Annual Crime Prevention Guide will support Kids Help Phone, a vital resource on Prince Edward Island. In 2020, children in PEI reached out to the Kids Help Phone over 13,000 times, which is 5,000 more contacts than in 2019. It is clear that COVID challenges are impacting mental health on a large scale and we all must support each other. I extend congratulations to all police officers whose dedication and commitment help ensure the safety of our residents and visitors to our community every day. You contribute greatly to our exceptional quality of life on PEI and for that we thank you. Sincerely, Mayor Basil L. Stewart City of Summerside MESSAGE FROM THE MAYOR OF SUMMERSIDE

31ST ANNUAL CRIME PREVENTION GUIDE 10 Dr. Wm. Neil McLure Psy.D., C.Psych. Clinical Psychology and Neuropsychology 292 Water Street, (Third Floor) Summerside, Prince Edward Island Canada C1N 1B8 Phone: (902) 432-3910 Fax: (902) 432-3007 E-mail: mclure@pei.sympatico.ca securityfirst@eastlink.ca Advantage Communications is a BPO service provider headquartered in PEI. We service major brands from across the globe and are committed to giving back to the community from which we employ. www.advantagecall.com Enjoy prime locations, comfort & convenience. Variety of apartment styles. 902-394-6100 www.killamproperties.com

11 CHILD ABUSE AWARENESS MESSAGE FROM THE CHARLOTTETOWN DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE This year marks the 31st year for the PEI Police Association Crime Prevention Guide. Each year the Association produces an annual crime prevention/awareness guide, which provides educational materials, information and prompts discussion on important issues facing our communities. This year the guide focuses on the issue of child abuse. Prevention is the best hope for reducing child abuse and neglect and improving the lives of children and families. Strengthening families and preventing child abuse requires a shared commitment of individuals and organizations in every community. The term "prevention" is typically used to represent activities that stop an action or behavior. It can also be used to represent activities that promote a positive action or behavior. Research has found that successful child abuse interventions must both reduce risk factors and promote protective factors to ensure the well-being of children and families. Knowledge is power, and education and information are key components to empowering individuals and making our communities safer. It is our collective hope that those reading the guide will find the information to be timely and informative and that this information will foster positive discussion among family and friends. The production of this guide not only raises awareness on an important issue, but also assist the Police Association in the efforts to fund and support very worthwhile projects within our Island communities. On behalf of the members and staff of the Charlottetown Police Services, I would like to congratulate the PEI Police Association for the production of this year’s community guide, and wish you every success in the future. Yours truly, Brad MacConnell Deputy Chief of Police Charlottetown Police Services

31ST ANNUAL CRIME PREVENTION GUIDE 12 Authorized BERNINA, BROTHER, HUSQVARNA VIKING, PFAFF & SINGER Sewing Machine dealer 61 Capital Drive Charlottetown, PE C1E 1E8 Suzanne Lane Phone: (902) 628-1998 • Email: info@qulitingb.ca www.quiltingb.ca North River Fire Department Mailing Address: P.O. Box 269, Cornwall, PE C0A 1H0 Physical Address: 66 Trans Canada Hwy Tel: (902) 566-2550 Fax: (902) 628-6341 email: nrfdchief@bellaliant.com www.nrfd.ca Let us help you translate the latest fashion trends to your own personal style. Lady Slipper offers the brands that are trend setting and inspired by the fashion runways around the world. Along with an experienced team, you will be assisted in a friendly, relaxing atmosphere. Come in and enjoy the exceptional service! Our Passion is Your Fashion! 65 Queen Street, Charlottetown, PE, Canada 902 892 6525 Mon. to Fri.: 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Sat.: 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Sun.: CLOSED Thank You for your Support

13 CHILD ABUSE AWARENESS Congratulations once again to the PEI Police Association for continuing their good work in the community in producing their 31st Annual Crime Prevention Guide. The theme selected for this year’s guide is ‘ChildAbuse Awareness’which touches the hearts of many islanders. Just as a precursor, child abuse is the physical or emotional abuse of a child by a parent, guardian, or other person, although in saying this, studies have shown that the abuse usually occurs in a dwelling by a family member. Most people in their own community may not be aware, but any one of their peers, friends, or neighbors may be victims of child abuse. Every day, someone experiences physical, emotional, neglect, and/or sexual abuse. If this issue is not addressed at the forefront, abuse can lead to serious physical or emotional injury which may affect the child for the rest of his/her life. In order to prevent child abuse, society must: recognize the types of abuse, understand common causes of abuse, know the characteristics of abusers, and realize the effects abuse has, not just on the child, but on families and communities across the province and indeed across the nation, so the prevention must first begin with understanding the different types of abuse. Physical or sexual abuse speaks for itself and is a horrendous crime. Emotional abuse interferes with a child's ability to develop at the pace of their age level. Emotional abuse victims tend to receive a limited or lack of attention or affection from their parents or siblings. Constant criticizing, belittling, insulting, rejecting and withholding love, affection, support and/or guidance are some examples of emotional abuse. They are also compared to others in a negative way, constantly bombarded with insults which eventually creates a lack of self-esteem. Every child deserves the right to grow up in a safe and healthy environment. However, this is not the case for many children. Children die every day in North America due to abuse and neglect, and it occurs at every level and across ethnic and cultural lines, within all religions and at all levels of education. It is very important for adults today to understand the role we play in a child’s life because of the positive impact we can have on them. It is important for adults to engage with children, listen to them, ask them questions, build rapport with them, etc. You never know, you may be the only person that child may trust. You may be the only person they feel comfortable sharing ‘secrets’ with. You may be the only person to notice red flags or abnormal behavior and you may just be the only person who gets them the help they need. In closing, the following are things we can do as a society to help diminish child abuse: Get involved with other parents in your community, discipline your children thoughtfully, examine your own behaviour, educate yourself and others, teach children their rights, support local prevention programs, know what child abuse is and what signs to look for, report the abuse if you witness any form of abuse and finally encourage leaders in the community to be supportive of children and families. We are all in this together, so please get behind this initiative to help stop the abuse. J. David Poirier Chief of Police Summerside Police Services MESSAGE FROM THE SUMMERSIDE CHIEF OF POLICE

31ST ANNUAL CRIME PREVENTION GUIDE 14 The COVID-19 pandemic has created many challenges and restrictions on community activities and events around the world. While we have all had to maintain our distance and reduce social gatherings to help slow the spread of COVID-19, we at the PEI Police Association look forward to seeing you again at our community events in the, hopefully, near future. We hope you’re all staying safe and well! Here are some highlights from some of our past community events. We are so proud to be part of the communities we serve!

15 CHILD ABUSE AWARENESS We are so proud to be part of the communities we serve!

31ST ANNUAL CRIME PREVENTION GUIDE 16 Bus: 902•838•3535 Fax: 902•838•2474 Robertson Road PO Box 1120 Montague, PE Canada C0A 1R0 24-HOUR RN CARE REGULAR DOCTOR VISITS PRIVATE OR SEMI PRIVATE UNITS CLOSE TO ALL AMENITIES 114 BEDS, 74 NURSING, 40 COMMUNITY CARE PLANNED ACTIVITY SCHEDULE HOME COOKED MEALS Nursing License No. 4 Community Care License No. 26 (902) 659-2337 (902) 659-2865 www.gillislodge.ca BELFAST DNS GRASSCUTTING & LANDSCAPING INC. CELL 628-5107 DNSgrasscutting@hotmail.com 2 Centennial Drive Cornwall, PE C0A 1H0 902-370-7267 n POLICE SCIENCE (CADET) n PROFESSIONAL FIREFIGHTING n CONSERVATION ENFORCEMENT n CORRECTIONAL OFFICER n SHERIFF & PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICER START YOUR CAREER TODAY Visit our website at hollandcollege.com/apa or contact 902-888-6704 aheffell@hollandcollege.com RR# 1 Trans Canda Highway Hazelbrook, PE C1B 0R9

17 CHILD ABUSE AWARENESS What is child abuse? Child abuse includes physical, sexual and emotional abuse. It also includes neglect, and any violence that children see or hear in their families.The person who abuses the child can be: • a parent; • a brother or sister; • another relative; • a caregiver; • a guardian; • a teacher; or • another professional or volunteer who works with children (for example, a doctor or coach). Abuse may take place in a child’s home, or it may happen in other places, like other people’s homes, schools, community centres or places of worship. Sometimes the child’s parents lived abuse as a child, such as in the residential schools many Indigenous peoples were forced to attend. Abuse that someone lived as a child, whether it happened in their home or outside of it, may change the way they parent their own children as abuse is often a learned behaviour. This booklet deals with child abuse in the family. In Canada, there are federal, provincial and territorial laws to protect children from abuse. Some types of abuse are crimes and are listed in the Criminal Code, which is a federal law. Federal laws are laws that apply across Canada. Even if the abuse is not a crime under the Criminal Code, provincial and territorial laws could be used to stop the abuse. Child abuse can cause long-term health problems. Every child deserves protection from abuse. Jack wrapped his fingers tighter around his granddaughter’s small hand as they entered the old medical centre. It took courage to make this appointment, but Jack knew they needed the social worker’s help. Little Ella and her brother had come to stay with her grandparents for a few weeks over the summer. They had all looked forward to the special visit, thinking it would be great for the kids to have lots of room to run and play. But the two children seemed distant and mostly played their computer games. Ella’s frequent nightmares quickly became a concern. Every loud noise seemed to make the little girl jump. Jack had set about earning Ella’s trust, bit by bit.When the vacation had come to an end, she had hid in the closet and refused to leave.Through Ella’s tears, Jack had learned that her parents were always fighting. Her father often pushed her mother and she in turn often threw things at him.There was lots of yelling. Ella thought it was all her fault and that if she went back something bad would happen. Jack’s heart ached at the thought of his daughter and his grandchildren enduring this kind of life. He didn’t like the idea of interfering, but he knew the children’s safety and well-being had to come first. He hoped it wasn’t too late for some counselling to help. Maybe his daughter and her husband could still turn things around and make a better home for the kids. Reproduced from the Department of Justice publication Child Abuse is Wrong: What Can I Do? without affiliation or endorsement of the Government of Canada.

31ST ANNUAL CRIME PREVENTION GUIDE 18 GAVAN GILL INC. GAVAN GILL PRES IDENT 566-5924 44 BELMONT ST. CHARLOTTETOWN, PE C1A 5H1 BELMONT@PEI.AIBN.COM BELMONT METAL WORKS 892 - 8469 BELMONT DISTRIBUTORS 566 - 1336 C. Shawn MacLean, CFSP General Manager “Helping you plan for tomorrow, today”

19 CHILD ABUSE AWARENESS Rick sat alone in the hospital coffee shop. He needed some time alone to calm his nerves. He had just made the call to Child Protection Services. He couldn’t believe he had taken this step. But his son Jason was waiting for an X-ray upstairs in the children’s section of the hospital to see if his arm was broken. And the doctor was clearly worried about how Jason had gotten his injuries. She had asked a lot of questions about the bruises on Jason’s wrists and face. Jason wouldn’t say much about what had happened at his mother’s place, except that his stepfather had locked him in his room for a long time.The boy’s new stepfather didn’t seem to like the boy very much. Rick felt his stomach clench. He knew that there was a lot at stake here. Rick’s ex-wife, Cathy, had mostly ignored her son Jason the first few years after the divorce.When she had finally started to take Jason for the weekends after she re-married, it had seemed like a new start for all of them. However, before long, Jason had stopped wanting to go over to his mother’s. Rick had thought it was just part of adjusting to the new family situation. He had felt sure that Cathy would never let any harm come to their son. Now that Rick knew that Cathy’s husband was abusing Jason, he knew he needed to protect his son.Also, there were other children living in that home. They must have witnessed the violence – they must be afraid that this could happen to them too. Everyone deserves a chance to get some help. Physical abuse What does it look like? Physical abuse is the intentional use of force against a child. It can cause physical pain, injury, or injury that may last a lifetime.This type of abuse includes: • pushing or shoving; • hitting, slapping or kicking; • strangling or choking; • pinching or punching; • biting; • burning; • throwing an object at a child; and • excessive or violent shaking. All of these acts are crimes in Canada. What can I do? Every province and territory has a law that says that any person who believes a child is being abused must report it. You will not get in trouble for making the report if you have reason to believe a child is being abused, even if it turns out you were wrong. See page 61 for contact information for Child Protection Service Offices on Prince Edward Island. If you know a child who is being physically abused, call your local police. In an emergency, call 9-1-1. If you have harmed your child, or think you might harm your child, get help. Here are some things you can do: • Call your local child protection services. • Talk to a social worker, counselor or teacher. • Call your local help line. • Call the police. • In an emergency, call 9-1-1. Reproduced from the Department of Justice publication Child Abuse is Wrong: What Can I Do? without affiliation or endorsement of the Government of Canada.

31ST ANNUAL CRIME PREVENTION GUIDE 20 Ron Lanigan HARDWOOD FLOORS 902.962.3417 536 Cambridge Road, Montague, PE C0A 1R0 King Truck Repair Phillip Lannigan (902) 894-4088 (902) 894-0533 - fax 404 Mount Edward Road Charlottetown PE C1E 2A1 kingtruckrepair@bellaliant.com Darcy Johnston PO Box 1349, Montague, PE C0A 1R0 (902) 838-4000 East Prince Funeral Home 245 Pope Road Summerside, PE C1N 5T4 Phone: (902) 436-0915 Fax: (902) 888-3112 Email: epfuneral@eastlink.ca Thank You for your Support

21 CHILD ABUSE AWARENESS Lori quietly wept over the sink, just staring at the afternoon dishes. Her hands were still shaking. She couldn’t believe how close she had just come to total disaster. She had only asked Kaila to pick up her toys! But when Kaila had thrown them all down the stairs, Lori had spun out of control. She was just so tired of the toddler’s tantrums. Lori knows Kaila is still young, but why can’t she learn to pick up things like her friends already do? It was seeing the cell phone in pieces among the broken toys that had made her start yelling. Where were they going to get the money to replace that? In an instant, she had slapped Kaila really hard. And the next thing she knew, Kaila had lost her balance at the top of the stairs.What was she thinking when she did that?Was she crazy? If Lori hadn’t grabbed her, Kaila would have fallen all the way down, just like her dolls. Lori began to sob. She loved Kaila, but everything seemed so hard these days with Roy out of work. She always feels like she’s failing, especially when it comes to Kaila. She’s got to stop doing things like this before something really bad happens. Kaila could have been seriously hurt! And she supposed that hitting Kaila like that could be considered an assault. Maybe she could check the Internet to find a parenting class or support group: there must be others like her going through this. Child discipline What does it look like? All children need their parents to teach them how to behave. Children need time to learn what they should and should not do.They learn to behave by: • watching their parents and other people; • getting clear instructions; and • being praised and encouraged for their efforts. The right kind of discipline teaches children responsibility, self-control, and right from wrong. It raises the child’s self-esteem, encourages the child to do better and strengthens the parent-child bond. Parents should never discipline children until the children are old enough to understand it. Why doesn’t spanking work? Experts say that spanking is not an effective form of discipline. Spanking can make children angry and resentful. It can cause them to lose trust in their parents. It teaches children that hitting others is okay. In the long run, spanking can make children’s behaviour worse. (continued) Reproduced from the Department of Justice publication Child Abuse is Wrong: What Can I Do? without affiliation or endorsement of the Government of Canada.

Royal Canadian Legion Branch #5 340 Notre Dame Street Summerside, PE C1N 1S5 31ST ANNUAL CRIME PREVENTION GUIDE 22 6 Myrtle Street - Stratford Business Park - 902 367 3618 Bweir@livefortoday.ca CHARLOTTETOWN BOTTLE AND METALS LIMITED Dealers in copper, brass, radiators, batteries, steel, bottles, etc. BILL KINNEY Bus: (902) 566-9897 Cell: (902) 628-5631 Mailing Address: PO Box 1136, Cornwall PE C0A 1H0 Corrigan Home 22 Hemlock Court, Charlottetown, PE C1A 8E3 (902) 894-9686 “Care for Seniors” 112 Camp Rd., Oyster Bed, PE C1E 0L4 • 902.621.0144 baysidervcampground.com Community of Miscouche Council

23 CHILD ABUSE AWARENESS (continued) What does work? What does work is to build your child’s confidence and problem-solving skills. It is important to figure out the reasons for your child’s behaviour.When you understand the reason for your child’s behaviour, it may be easier to handle the situation without losing your temper. Ways to help your child behave well: • Create a loving and respectful home. • Be a good role model. • Focus on prevention. • Decide what is truly important and have a few clear and consistent rules. • Tell your child what you expect. • Praise your child’s efforts, even if they’re not perfect. • Respect your child’s need to express their emotions. • Listen to your child’s thoughts, ideas and concerns. •Watch your child closely so you can redirect behaviour before it gets worse. • Make sure that you both get enough sleep. • Make sure that you both eat nutritious food regularly and exercise. • Last but not least, try to have fun with your child. Reproduced from the Department of Justice publication Child Abuse is Wrong: What Can I Do? without affiliation or endorsement of the Government of Canada. (continued) The law on assault in the Criminal Code The Criminal Code outlines most crimes in Canada. It says that assaulting someone or threatening to assault someone is a crime.Touching someone without their consent can be an assault, even if it doesn’t harm them. Under the law, assault can include: • slapping; • punching; • pinching; • kicking; • confining; • restraining; or • unwanted touching. However, not every action where one person hits another person is assault. And not every threat of contact is assault. People may give their consent to contact. For example, hockey players may body check each other without it being a crime. This is because they have given their consent to physical contact within the rules of the sport. Also, section 43 of the Criminal Code can give parents and caregivers a defence to a charge of assault in limited cases if they use reasonable force. Section 43 of the Criminal Code says that parents and caregivers who use reasonable force to correct a child’s behaviour may not be found guilty of assault. But section 43 is not a defence for every use of force against a child. Parents or caregivers may only use reasonable force to correct or protect the child. For example, a parent may use reasonable force to put a child in their room for a time out or to pull a child away from traffic. A person who has physically or sexually abused a child cannot use section 43 as a defence.

31ST ANNUAL CRIME PREVENTION GUIDE 24 Committing to the province of Prince Edward Island 161 St. Peters Road, Charlottetown, PE C1A 5P6 Ph: (902)-566-4212 Fax: (902)-566-2516 Contact us with any of your building automation and service needs Royal Canadian Legion Branch #22 1136 Ellerslie Rd., Ellerslie, PE C0B 1J0 COMPLETE NEW HOME CONSTRUCTION CONCRETE WORK & FOUNDATIONS RENOVATIONS - ADDITIONS FOR ALL YOUR CONSTRUCTION NEEDS RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL FREE ESTIMATES P.O. BOX 24023, STRATFORD, PE C1B 2V5 ROBERT McNALLY CELL: (902) 626-7614 FAX: (902) 367-9440 robertmcnally@eastlink.ca WARREN’S CARPENTRY INC 850 Read Drive Summerside, PE C1N 4J8 902.436.2236 O’Brien Auto Recycling & Towing 2224 St. Marys Road Montague, PE C0A 1R0 Cell: (902) 969-3993 Toll Free: 1-866-962-3993 Email: darrinobrien@hotmail.com Open Monday - Friday 7am - 5pm

25 CHILD ABUSE AWARENESS The Supreme Court of Canada decision In 2004, the Supreme Court of Canada looked at section 43.The Court decided that a parent or guardian who uses force to correct a child can only use it in the following ways: • The person may only use force to correct a child if it will help the child learn.The person can never use force in anger. • The child must be between two-years old and twelve-years old. (This means that section 43 is not a defence if the child is younger than two or older than twelve). • The person can only use reasonable force and its impact can only be “transitory and trifling.” (This means that the force causes little or no pain, and does not leave marks on the child). • The person must not use an object, such as a ruler or belt, to apply the force. • The person must not hit or slap the child’s face or head. • The seriousness of what happened or what the child did is not relevant to how much force is used in discipline. It may be acceptable for a person to use reasonable force to restrain a child in some circumstances. For example, you may need to hold your child down to put them in a car seat. It is not considered reasonable for you to hit a child in anger or to get back at the child for something the child did. It is against the law to hit a child in anger. The use of force when managing children’s behaviour There are times when you may have to use force to control a child and keep the child, or other children, safe. For example, you may need to touch or restrain a child to keep the child from running across the street. Or you may need to carry a screaming three-year old out of a store. Without section 43, parents and caregivers could face criminal charges and might have to go to court to defend their actions whenever they use force to respond to a child’s behaviour. If you are angry, however, find some way to cool down before you manage your child’s behaviour. (continued) (continued) Reproduced from the Department of Justice publication Child Abuse is Wrong: What Can I Do? without affiliation or endorsement of the Government of Canada.

31ST ANNUAL CRIME PREVENTION GUIDE 26 PEI PROFESSIONAL BOOKKEEPING SERVICES INC. 450 Main Street, PO Box 422 Alberton, PE C0B 1B0 Phone: (902) 231-3055 Fax: (902) 726-3457 nancyjpitre@gmail.com Nancy Pitre Business Owner 491 Main Street, Alberton 902-231-HAIR (4247) 167 Minajane Drive Charlottetown, PE C1E 2L9 (902) 367-3041 www.habitatpei.ca MacDougall Steel Erectors, Inc. 168 Industrial Drive Borden-Carleton, PE C0B 1X0 Tel: 1-902-855-2100 Extension 223 Cell: 1-902-303-5109 Fax: 1-902-855-2104 Email: kirk@mseinc.ca www.mseinc.ca Alan Preston 149 Great George Street Charlottetown, PE C1A 4K7 (902) 566-1499 1-800-693-2211 flowers@heartsandflowers.ca www.heartsandflowers.ca RECEIVERCOFFEE.COM (902) 367-3436 128 RICHMOND ST CHARLOTTETOWN, PE C1A 1H9

27 CHILD ABUSE AWARENESS Provincial and territorial child protection laws Even if the way you discipline your child is not a crime, it could still be abuse.The provinces and territories also have laws to protect children from abuse. These laws allow the provincial or territorial government to step in when a child needs to be protected from abuse or neglect. What can I do? Every province and territory has a law that says any person who believes a child is being abused must report it. You will not get in trouble for making the report if you have reason to believe a child is being abused, even if it turns out you were wrong. Depending on where you live, this could be your local child protection office or the police. If you have harmed your child, or think you might harm your child, get help. Here are some places you can go for help: • your family doctor or public health nurse; • family resource centres; • local child protection services; • local public health department; • parenting programs; • parenting resources, like booklets; or • organizations that help immigrants and newcomers. See page 61 for contact information for Child Protection Service Offices on Prince Edward Island. (continued) Reproduced from the Department of Justice publication Child Abuse is Wrong: What Can I Do? without affiliation or endorsement of the Government of Canada. Need help but don’t know where to start? 211 can help. It’s free and confidential. CALL: 211 TEXT: 211 SEARCH: pe.211.ca EMAIL: help@pe.211.ca

31ST ANNUAL CRIME PREVENTION GUIDE 28 (902) 436-4877 34 Water Street, Summerside PE, C1N 4T8 cell: 902-626-9081 KENSINGTON CO-OPERATIVE ASSN PO Box 338, Kensington, PE C0B 1M0 Proud to Support PEI Police Association AUTO BODY Phone # (902) 368-3827 PREFERRED INSURANCE REPAIR FACILITY “LIFETIME” GUARANTEE ON COLLISION REPAIRS www.gaudetsautobody.com Dr. Guy Boswall 18 MacLeod Cres., Charlottetown, PE C1E 3K2 902-892-3200 NATIVE COUNCIL OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND Phone: (902) 892-5314 Fax: (902) 368-7464 Toll Free: 1-833-299-3422 www.ncpei.com 6 F.J. McAulay Court Charlottetown, PE C1A 9M7

29 CHILD ABUSE AWARENESS Kate watched the kids climb the play structure in the late autumn sunshine. It was good to see Michael laughing again and joining in the games. Her heart went out to him.The last year had been so difficult.When he had first come to her pre-school daycare, she had thought of Michael as shy and quiet. However, after a while, she had started to wonder if something was going on. Little remarks he had made suggested he knew more about sex than most kids his age.When some of the children had told her that Michael was touching their private parts, she had started to worry. But when Michael also complained that it hurt to go to the bathroom, she had quickly put two and two together. Kate had known right away that she had a duty to report the situation, even if she was worried about where it might all lead.What would it mean for Michael? And for his family? Even for her business? In the end, the authorities had discovered Michael’s uncle had sexually abused both Michael and his older brother. The investigation was hard for the family and for everyone involved. But the children were safe now and receiving counselling. She feels a lot of hope for Michael. She believes that he will learn to feel good about himself again and build a new sense of trust. Sexual abuse What does it look like? All sexual contact with anyone without consent is a crime called sexual assault. This includes sexual touching.The Criminal Code contains many offences that protect children from sexual abuse, which happens when a person takes advantage of a child for sexual purposes. It does not always involve physical contact with a child. For example, it could happen when an adult invites a child to touch herself or himself sexually or attempts to lure a child over the Internet for sexual purposes. Sexual contact between an adult and a child under 16 is a crime. In Canada, the general age of consent to sexual activity is 16 years, but there are some exceptions if the other person is close in age to the child. The age of consent is 18 years in some circumstances, for example, where the sexual activity takes place in a relationship of trust, dependency or authority or where the relationship is exploitative of the child.A person of authority or trust could be a parent, step-parent, grandparent, older sibling, teacher or coach. What can I do? If you know a child who is being sexually abused, report it to the police immediately. In an emergency, call 9-1-1. Every province and territory has a law that says that any person who believes a child is being abused must report it.You will not get in trouble for making the report if you have reason to believe a child is being abused, even if it turns out you were wrong. If you have questions about how to recognize child sexual abuse, here are some things you can do: • Call your local child protection services. • Talk to a nurse, social worker, doctor or teacher. • Call the police. Reproduced from the Department of Justice publication Child Abuse is Wrong: What Can I Do? without affiliation or endorsement of the Government of Canada.

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31 CHILD ABUSE AWARENESS Nora knew she had to speak to her sister, Irene, again. She could see that Irene’s son Patrick was always on edge. His father, Sean, showed little interest in Patrick, except to criticize him.When it came to Patrick, the words “stupid” and “weakling” slid easily off Sean’s tongue. Nothing Patrick could do would meet his father’s standards. His school grades weren’t high enough, his hockey game was poor, and his friends were lazy. On the other hand, their older son, Ryan, received nothing but praise. Nora wondered why her sister went along with this. Maybe Irene was too busy trying to meet her husband’s expectations herself to see what was going on with her son. Patrick was either invisible or a problem. No wonder he was still wetting the bed! Nora had spoken to Irene, but her sister had quickly changed the subject.“It’s not that serious,” she had said. “Patrick needs to be tougher.” Nora wondered how she could find the right words to break through to Irene. She had picked up some pamphlets about child abuse at the community centre. Perhaps she could use them to start a conversation about their own father’s harsh behaviour. Maybe if Irene could remember the pain of that old abuse, she could find the strength to get some help for herself and for Patrick. Emotional abuse What does it look like? Emotional abuse happens when a person uses words or actions to control, frighten, isolate, or take away a child’s self-respect and sense of worth. Emotional abuse is sometimes called psychological abuse. It can include: • putting a child down or humiliating a child; • constantly criticizing a child; • constantly yelling at a child; • threatening to harm a child or others; • keeping a child from seeing their family or friends without good reason; or • threatening to move a child out of their home. Some forms of emotional abuse are crimes in Canada, including: • threatening to harm a child; • threatening to harm another person; • threatening to destroy the child’s personal property; • threatening to hurt the child’s pet; • harassing the child on the telephone; • deliberately intimidating a child; and • advising a child to commit suicide. Other forms of emotional abuse are not crimes, but they are still very serious. The provinces and territories also have laws that protect children from emotional abuse.These laws protect children even if the type of abuse is not a crime. Reproduced from the Department of Justice publication Child Abuse is Wrong: What Can I Do? without affiliation or endorsement of the Government of Canada. (continued)

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33 CHILD ABUSE AWARENESS Children who see or hear family violence Children can also suffer emotional abuse from seeing or hearing violence between other family members. Even if they don’t see or hear the violence, they can be affected by seeing the results of the violence. It can be very hard for children to see or hear family violence even if they are not being physically hurt themselves.They will probably feel scared and insecure. What can I do? Every province and territory has a law that says that any person who believes a child is being abused must report it.You will not get in trouble for making the report if you have reason to believe a child is being abused, even if it turns out you were wrong. If you believe that a child you know is being emotionally abused, you can: • Call your local child protection services. • Talk to a public health nurse, doctor, social worker or teacher. • Call your local help line. (continued) Reproduced from the Department of Justice publication Child Abuse is Wrong: What Can I Do? without affiliation or endorsement of the Government of Canada. Need help but don’t know where to start? 211 can help. It’s free and confidential. CALL: 211 TEXT: 211 SEARCH: pe.211.ca EMAIL: help@pe.211.ca

31ST ANNUAL CRIME PREVENTION GUIDE 34 30 Maplewood Drive Summerside, PE C1N 5E6 21 Jordan Crescent, Charlottetown, PE C1A 2W2 (902) 892-8703 F: (902) 892-9513 andrewsmotorrepair.ca 110 Walker Ave, Summerside, PE C1N 6V9 www.summersidetoyota.com 1-902-436-5800 Summerside Toyota 11 Esher St., Charlottetown, PE C1A 5G2 (902) 566-5776 (902) 569-3432 ( 2 56 St. Peters Rd, Charlottetown, PE C1A 5N5 Thank You for your Support It is the law to report it if you believe that a child is being abused. CALL (902) 368-6657

35 CHILD ABUSE AWARENESS Neglect What does it look like? Neglect happens when a parent or guardian fails to meet a child’s basic needs. Sometimes parents neglect their children on purpose. Sometimes parents don’t mean to neglect their children, but they have so many problems themselves that they can’t look after their children properly. Neglect can include: • not giving a child proper food or warm clothing; • not providing a child with a safe and warm place to live; • not making sure a child washes regularly; • not providing enough health care or medicine; • not paying any attention to a child’s emotional needs; • not preventing physical harm; and • not making sure a child is supervised properly. Sometimes, neglect can hurt just as much as physical abuse. Some forms of neglect are crimes in Canada. For example, failing to provide the necessaries of life and child abandonment are crimes.The provinces and territories also have laws to protect children from neglect. These laws protect children even if the type of abuse is not a crime. What can I do? Every province and territory has a law that says that any person who believes a child is being abused must report it. You will not get in trouble for making the report if you have reason to believe a child is being abused, even if it turns out you were wrong. If you believe that a child you know is being neglected you can: • Call your local child protection services. • Call the police. • Talk to a public health nurse, doctor, social worker or teacher. • Call your local help line. • In an emergency, call 9-1-1. Nikhita shivered as she removed her winter coat and wrapped it around little Olivia. She turned the car heater to high as she helped the seven year-old into her car and called 9-1-1 on her cell phone. Nikhita had stayed into the evening at the school to mark exams. It had been snowing for hours when she came out, so she was shocked to find her young student huddled beside her car in the parking lot.The girl’s hair and sweater were glistening with snow. Her voice was barely a whisper when she told Nikhita that no one was at home and her house was locked. No, she didn’t know where her parents were. Olivia had only been at the school for a month, but Nikhita had already expressed her concern about the girl to the principal. She looked tired all the time and rarely brought a lunch to school. Now that it was winter, it was clear that she didn’t have a winter coat or winter boots.The other kids had sensed Olivia was unprotected and taken to teasing her. Nikhita knew the principal had tried calling the girl’s parents, but hadn’t got through. Clearly, the time had come for stronger measures. It would be up to the police to figure out what was going on at home.This kind of neglect was too much. Olivia and her family needed help. Nikhita put her arm around the little girl to keep them both warm as they waited for the ambulance to arrive. Reproduced from the Department of Justice publication Child Abuse is Wrong: What Can I Do? without affiliation or endorsement of the Government of Canada.

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